efedra:

Death of Marat, Rez-de-Chaussée, Château de Versailles, 1985

by Robert Polidori

(via tellingteeth)

Timestamp: 1398273126

efedra:

Death of Marat, Rez-de-Chaussée, Château de Versailles, 1985

by Robert Polidori

(via tellingteeth)

(Source: afoga-te, via me--gs)

Timestamp: 1398212983

(Source: afoga-te, via me--gs)

humansofnewyork:

A one hundred year old woman reflects on her deceased husband.

  • Me: oh thats cute
  • *checks price tag*
  • Me: no its not

nohighs:

YOU REALLY THINK A FUCKIN PANCAKE IS GONNA FIX THIS HEATHER

(via sebastiansisson)

Timestamp: 1398212882

nohighs:

YOU REALLY THINK A FUCKIN PANCAKE IS GONNA FIX THIS HEATHER

(via sebastiansisson)

hermione:

Jemima Kirke photographed by Frances Tulk-Hart

(Source: 5minuteswithfranny.com, via mccxxiv)

Timestamp: 1398141165

hermione:

Jemima Kirke photographed by Frances Tulk-Hart

(Source: 5minuteswithfranny.com, via mccxxiv)

umq:

The park admits the wind, the petals lift and scatter.

(via theblueforestnymph)

Timestamp: 1398141061

umq:

The park admits the wind, the petals lift and scatter.

(via theblueforestnymph)

whats-my-name-i-forgot:

saemiligr:

catbunting:

Note to self

This movie means more to me than words can say

one of the best speeches in movie history   

(Source: jacknicholson, via awlivur)

Timestamp: 1398141016

whats-my-name-i-forgot:

saemiligr:

catbunting:

Note to self

This movie means more to me than words can say

one of the best speeches in movie history   

(Source: jacknicholson, via awlivur)

"I think the concept of virginity was created by men who thought their penises were so important it changes who a woman is."

Unknown

The most perfect conclusion about how “virginity” came to be I’ve ever encountered.

(via paulineway)

(Source: dolly-lungs, via xoxotaylor-)

ifyoucarryonthisway:

hello 911 my sock is falling down inside my shoe 

(Source: averagefairy, via unicord)

foxesandfeathers:

Blindsided. This lady’s love has turned my world upside down in the greatest of ways.

(via ifyou-werehere)

Timestamp: 1397711531

foxesandfeathers:

Blindsided. This lady’s love has turned my world upside down in the greatest of ways.

(via ifyou-werehere)

innocenttmaan:

Andres Amador is an artist who uses the beach as his canvas, racing against the tide to create these large scale temporary masterpieces using a rake or stick ..

Andres’ creations are simply stunning and knowing that these delicate creations are temporary somehow makes them even more beautiful.

(via m-0-0-n-d-a-n-c-3)

Timestamp: 1397710500

innocenttmaan:

Andres Amador is an artist who uses the beach as his canvas, racing against the tide to create these large scale temporary masterpieces using a rake or stick ..

Andres’ creations are simply stunning and knowing that these delicate creations are temporary somehow makes them even more beautiful.

(via m-0-0-n-d-a-n-c-3)

museumuesum:

David Horvitz

The Distance of a Day, 2013

Two iphones, Two videos, 12 minutes each

In early February I asked my mom to go and watch the sunset and make a video. She did this from the Palos Verdes Peninsula, where I used to watch the sunset when I lived in California. She made the video with her iPhone taped to a metal barrier that protects people from falling over the cliffs.

In synchronicity with her, I too was looking at the sun and making a video. From my perspective the sun was rising. I had calculated where the the sun would be seen as rising at the exact same moment it was seen as setting in Los Angeles. In early February this was the Maldives, a location which may not exist in the near future due to the rising of the seas.

As my mom watched the sun set into the Pacific Ocean, I was watching it rise over the Laccadive Sea. Synoptic is a useful term here. It comes from the Greek syn, meaning “together”, and optic, meaning “seen”. Though separated by thousands of miles, we were watching the sun together.

The title, The Distance of a Day, is a reference to the idea of the journey. Originally, journey meant the distance one traveled in a day. Here, the spatial distance that separated my mother and myself was not defined by the distance one could travel in a day, but by the day itself. By the delimitations of a day - where the sun rises and where the sun sets.

Phones were chosen to make (and display) the video because they are devices that orient us spatially and temporally. They are like contemporary pocket-watches and compasses that we carry with us. They coordinate and synchronize us. They broadcast moments instantaneously across distances. Or, what seems to be instantaneously. There is always some delay.

The same two phones that were used to shoot the videos, that were once on opposite sides of the world, are now used to display the videos. They are now only inches away.

Right now somewhere the sun is simultaneously setting and rising. Someone or something is probably bearing witness to this.

(via wiblog)

Timestamp: 1397710432

museumuesum:

David Horvitz

The Distance of a Day, 2013

Two iphones, Two videos, 12 minutes each

In early February I asked my mom to go and watch the sunset and make a video. She did this from the Palos Verdes Peninsula, where I used to watch the sunset when I lived in California. She made the video with her iPhone taped to a metal barrier that protects people from falling over the cliffs.

In synchronicity with her, I too was looking at the sun and making a video. From my perspective the sun was rising. I had calculated where the the sun would be seen as rising at the exact same moment it was seen as setting in Los Angeles. In early February this was the Maldives, a location which may not exist in the near future due to the rising of the seas.

As my mom watched the sun set into the Pacific Ocean, I was watching it rise over the Laccadive Sea. Synoptic is a useful term here. It comes from the Greek syn, meaning “together”, and optic, meaning “seen”. Though separated by thousands of miles, we were watching the sun together.

The title, The Distance of a Day, is a reference to the idea of the journey. Originally, journey meant the distance one traveled in a day. Here, the spatial distance that separated my mother and myself was not defined by the distance one could travel in a day, but by the day itself. By the delimitations of a day - where the sun rises and where the sun sets.

Phones were chosen to make (and display) the video because they are devices that orient us spatially and temporally. They are like contemporary pocket-watches and compasses that we carry with us. They coordinate and synchronize us. They broadcast moments instantaneously across distances. Or, what seems to be instantaneously. There is always some delay.

The same two phones that were used to shoot the videos, that were once on opposite sides of the world, are now used to display the videos. They are now only inches away.

Right now somewhere the sun is simultaneously setting and rising. Someone or something is probably bearing witness to this.

(via wiblog)